General Schedule and AOS Program (Detail)

AOS and ASSW: March 2016 - Draft program overview and in detail now available below! 

A more detailed AOS 2016 PROGRAM is now available below, including a program overview). The following program includes the International Arctic Assembly (March 15) and the Arctic Observing Summit (March 16-18), with poster sessions (March 16-17). The six AOS 2016 Themes are described in detail here. Breakout sessions under each Theme will take place on March 16 and 17 and all AOS participants are invited to provide their input, listen to thematic presentations and participate in discussions (scroll down to see these sessions or download descriptions here; e.g. Theme 6).

ASSW 2016 will include many other side meetings, public events and lectures, panel discussions, and scientific presentations. For detailed activities of the entire week during ASSW 2016, including Arctic Council SAO and Working Group meetings, workshops, lectures, business meetings, networking and other events, visit https://assw2016.org/ . You can also register for optional events such as the banquet and side trips to enjoy Fairbanks during your stay. Tours on the Alaska Railroad are also a great way to see beautiful Alaskan landscapes.

AOS 2016 - PROGRAM IN DETAIL

SHORTCUTS: International Arctic Assembly | AOS Day 1 | AOS Day 2 | AOS Day 3 | Posters | White papers | Synthesis documents
AOS Plenaries: Day 1: A -- B | Day 2: C -- D
| Day 3:- E -- F 
AOS Thematic Breakout Sessions: Day 1: 1 -- 2 | Day 2: 3 -- 4 (cross-theme sessions)
Poster sessions: Day 1 | Day 2 

See also full ASSW Program for all events.

AOS Program cover

A O S   2 0 1 6  -  P R O G R A M   O V E R V I E W

(Download pdf of overview only)

A O S    2 0 1 6  -   P R O G R A M  I N  D E T A I L

 

  INTERNATIONAL ARCTIC ASSEMBLY 

TUESDAY, MARCH 15  | Building: Davis Concert Hall   |   Room: Main Hall

SCHEDULE

8:15-8:30 am 

INTRODUCTION AND WELCOME  

Welcome and introduction: Larry Hinzman, Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks  

The International Arctic Assembly is a high-level, international, open forum. Discussions will focus on the science-policy interface, the role of the Arctic community in addressing climate change, emerging needs in a changing Arctic, progress on research and new initiatives of select Arctic Council working groups, and the role of research in decision making, policy, industry, security and environmental stewardship.

   • Traditional welcome: Steve Ginnis, Executive Director, Fairbanks Native Association 
   • National welcome:  Admiral Robert Papp, Special Representative for the Arctic, U.S. Department of State

8:30-9:30 am 

SESSION A - Cooperation, Science and Policy 

A high-level discussion of the policy-science interface, focusing on the role of the Arctic in addressing climate change. Speakers will examine the role of science in informing policy, in particular how the research community, the people of the Arctic and the policy community can best work together to address urgent questions such as effective responses to a rapidly changing Arctic. Ten-minute presentations by a panel of speakers, each with guiding questions, followed by plenary discussion with questions submitted by e-mail or text from the audience through a moderator. 

  • Facilitator:  Byron Mallott, Lieutenant Governor of Alaska  

Presentations:  

 • Keynote presentation: Ambassador David A. Balton, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oceans and Fisheries in the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, U.S. Department of State
 • Keynote presentation: David M. Kennedy, NOAA Deputy Under Secretary for Operations 
 • Keynote presentation: 
Inuuteq Holm Olsen, ‎Minister Plenipotentiary for Greenland 
 • Keynote presentation: 
Marcus Carson, Senior Research Fellow, Stockholm Environment Institute 

9:30-10:45 am 

SESSION B – Emerging Research Needs in a Changing Arctic

Looking forward to the Arctic of coming years and decades, speakers will discuss their organization’s perspectives on the science, coordination, and collaborations needed to respond effectively to emerging needs. Presentations will also address the changing role of international collaboration at the circum-Arctic and global level. Ten-minute presentations by a panel of speakers, each with guiding questions, followed by plenary discussion with questions submitted by e-mail or text from the audience through a moderator. 

  • Facilitator: Don Forbes, Vice Chair, Future Earth Coasts, Canada

Presentations and Discussion

  • IASC: Susan Barr, President, International Arctic Science Committee
  • Arctic Council:  Julia Gourley, U.S. Senior Arctic Official, U.S. Department of State
  • ICARP III (3rd International Conference on Arctic Science Research Planning): Volker Rachold, Executive Secretary,  International Arctic Science Committee (IASC)
  • EU Horizon 2020: Andrea Tilche, Head of Unit, Climate Action and Earth Observation, European Commission 
  • Polar Research Board (PRB), Emerging Research Questions: Julie Brigham-Grette, Chair, U.S. National Academy of Sciences Polar Research Board 
  • International Study of Arctic Change (ISAC): Peter Schlosser, Chair, International Study of Arctic Change 

10:45-11:00 am  BREAK 
11 am-12:15 pm 

SESSION C - Progress and Emerging Initiatives: Perspectives on research and sustained observations from select Arctic Council Working Groups and Task Force

Speakers will examine progress made in recent years in building on research contributions to address grand challenges of a changing Arctic. Ten-minute presentations by a panel of speakers, each with guiding questions, followed by plenary discussion with questions submitted by e-mail or text from the audience through a moderator. 

  • Facilitator: Fran Ulmer, Chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission

Presentations and Discussion

  • Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF): Reidar Hindrum, Chair, Norwegian Environment Agency
  • Arctic Contaminants Action Programme: Ulrik Westman, Chair, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
  • Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) Working Group: Martin Forsius, Chair, Finnish Environment Institute 
  • Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment (PAME) Working Group: Renée Sauve, Chair, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canada 
  • Sustainable Development Working Group (SDWG) Working Group: Roberta Burns, Chair, U.S. Department of State  

12:15-1:45 pm  LUNCH 
1:45-2:45 pm 

SESSION D - Role of scientific research in decision making, policy, industry, security and environmental stewardship

Presentations and discussions will focus on the role of scientific research in decision-making, policy, industry, security and environmental stewardship. Speakers will challenge the research community to address opportunities and problems associated with rapid Arctic change. Presentations will lay out key priorities and explore approaches towards collaborative responses and innovations. Ten-minute presentations by a panel of speakers, each with guiding questions, followed by plenary discussion with questions submitted by e-mail or text from the audience through a moderator. 

  • Facilitator: Michael Sfraga, Vice Chancellor for University and Student Advancement, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Presentations and Discussion

  • Economic Development and Policy: Tara Sweeney, Arctic Economic Council 
  • Indigenous Peoples’ / Permanent Participants Organizations: Okalik Eegeesiak, International Inuit Circumpolar Council
  • Living Marine Resources Co-Management: Anders Oskal, Executive Director, International Center for Reindeer Husbandry (*invited) 
  • Arctic communities: Mikhail Pogodaev, Northern Forum

2:45-3:00 pm  BREAK 
3:00-4:30 pm 

SESSION D - Role of scientific research in decision making, policy, industry, security and environmental stewardship – Continued

Ten-minute presentations by a panel of speakers, each with guiding questions, followed by plenary discussion with questions submitted by e-mail or text from the audience through a moderator. 

  • Facilitator: John Farrell, Executive Director, U.S. Arctic Research Commission

Presentations

  • Emergency response: Amy Merten, Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response Working Group (EPPR), Arctic Council, and U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 
  • Private sector: Michael Macrander, Royal Dutch Shell
  • Non-Arctic Nations, Japan: Atsushi Sunami, Japan National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies 
  • Non-Arctic Nations, Korea: Yeadong Kim, President, Korea Polar Research Institute
  • Scientific Cooperation Task Force, Arctic Council: Evan Bloom, Director, Bureau of Oceans, Environment and Science Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs, U.S. Department of State, and Kelly Falkner, Director, U.S. National Science Foundation Division of Polar Programs

4:30-5:00 pm 

CONCLUSION

  • Introduction: James Johnsen, President, University of Alaska
  • Closing remarks: Ambassador Mark Brzezinski, Executive Director, Arctic Executive Steering Committee
  • Conclusion and Logistics: Larry Hinzman, Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks

5:00 pm  *AOS Executive Organizing Committee Meeting  (CLOSED) - Building: Gruening   |   Room: 303 
6:00 and 7:00 pm 

RECEPTION AND BANQUET  -  Carlson Center, 2010 Second Avenue, Fairbanks

Networking opportunities for all ASSW participants (Arctic Council SAO, AOS, MAC, APECS, diverse invited speakers, representatives from a broad cross-section of polar and scientific programs, government agencies, funders, communities and countries, guests, and all meeting attendees who register)


ARCTIC OBSERVING SUMMIT - DAY 1

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16 

7:15-8:30 am  *AOS Executive Organizing Committee Meeting and Co-leads Breakfast Meeting Building: Gruening   |   Room: 303 (CLOSED) 
8:45-8:55 am 

WELCOME

Davis Concert Hall

  • Hajo Eicken, AOS Executive Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee; AOS Co-chair
  • Michael K. Powers, Chancellor, University of Alaska Fairbanks

8:55- 10:45 am 

PLENARY - SESSION A - Arctic Observing & Background

Davis Concert Hall

Sessions provide background on the Arctic Observing Summit, previous recommendations, overviews of Arctic observing activities, progress in cryospheric, environmental, and marine system observing, and important aspects of community-based observing. (Presentations are ~25 min. each including questions)

Background: Arctic observing and progress

Moderator: Hajo Eicken

  • Arctic observing and physical sciences: Ice sheets and glaciers: Konrad Steffen, Swiss Federal Research Institute
  • Arctic observing and ocean biogeochemistry: Naomi Harada, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science & Technology 
  • Key aspects in community-based observations: Lene Kielsen Holm, Greenland Climate Research Centre, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  • GEO and the GEO Cold Regions initiative: Barbara Ryan, GEO Secretariat, Group on Earth Observations

10:45-11:10 am  BREAK 
11:10 am-12:15 pm 

PLENARY- SESSION B -  AOS background, progress and introduction to AOS 2016

Davis Concert Hall

Moderator: Sandy Starkweather

  • Introduction to Arctic Observing and the System of systems (30 min.): Peter Schlosser, Co-chair, ISAC Science Steering Group and AOS Co-chair, Columbia University
  • AOS Overview from 2013 & 2014 - progress, gaps and recommendations (10 min.): Maribeth Murray, Executive Director, ISAC, Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary
  • Introduction to AOS 2016 themes, and guidelines for process, breakout sessions and participation (15 min.): Hajo Eicken, AOS Co-chair, and Director, International Arctic Research Center (IARC), University of Alaska Fairbanks 

12:15-1:45 pm LUNCH 
1:45-3 pm

1. BREAK-OUT SESSIONS & PRESENTATIONS - Thematic Working Groups - CONCURRENT

Building: Gruening   |   Rooms: See below for each Theme

Concurrent break-out sessions are open to all AOS participants and focus on AOS input from the white papers and statements addressing each of the six AOS 2016 themes (descriptions  below and on AOS 2016 website). For all breakout sessions, AOS participants can provide input during discussions and are free to move among the concurrent sessions.

(Concurrent, 1:45-3 pm

#1-Theme 1: International and National Strategies for sustained support of long-term Arctic Observing

Room 409

THEME 1 DESCRIPTION: A successful Arctic Observing System that will deliver significant and long-lived benefits for the Arctic environment and communities has to be based on a solid innovative design and implementation plan developed with active participation of relevant stakeholders and indigenous representatives. Such a system can only be built around a commitment to long-term support at national and international scales, by Arctic and non-Arctic nations, where the role of institutional (e.g. funding agencies, public administrations) and non-institutional (e.g. private sector) actors is clearly identified and coordinated.  We invite discussion at AOS 2016 on sustained support and funding strategies that will enable the development of an integrated plan for Arctic observation. White papers may address questions such as:  Which elements of an Arctic Observing System require sustained and stable support? How can research-oriented observations move to operational ones? How can non-institutional funds be secured? How to build a plan in which both national and international initiatives can efficiently share resources, which is supported by innovative funding mechanisms that deliver sustainability, integration and excellence?

Co-leads: Andrea Tilche (European Commission); Jeremy Mathis (NOAA)

Description: Speakers and discussion. Observing Systems. Speaker: Ola Gråbak (Earth Observation Directorate, European Space Agency). Contributor: Dr. James Morison (Applied Physics Laboratory, Polar Science Center). Congributor: Ignatius Rigor (Applied Physics Laboratory, Polar Science Center). Contributor: Timothy C. Bartholomaus (University of Texas) - Greenland Ice/Ocean observing; GrIOOS/GRISO project.

(Concurrent, 1:45-3 pm

#1-Theme 2: Technology and Innovation for sustained Arctic observations

Room 408

THEME 2 DESCRIPTION: A modern pan-Arctic Observing System relies on technical innovation to achieve the appropriate spatial and temporal resolution. Key needs include improved interoperability and sensor development and the ability to generate accurate and continuous data records. These needs have already been discussed during previous Summits but further enhancement and discussion of the topic is needed. During the AOS 2016, topics for discussion include the utility of drones (UAVs, Unmanned Aircraft Systems or Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems) and their role in remotely sensing the atmosphere, operation across national borders, and exploration of the use of modern technology for community-based observations. Advances in other technologies that may support sustained Arctic observations (such as unmanned underwater vehicles, AUVs and unmanned surface vehicles, USVs) may also be discussed.

Co-leads: Cliff Sweatte (ICAO, International Civil Aviation Organization, USA); Rune Storvold (NORUT, Norway)

Description: Speakers and Discussion. Autonomous Sensing Technologies. Speaker: Dr. Phillip McGillivary (U. S. Coast Guard [USCG], PACAREA). Dr. McGillivary coordinates science issues for the USCG for the Pacific Ocean in conjunction with USCG Headquarters and their Research & Development Center.. Speaker: Prof. Torbjørn Eltoft (UiT Arctic University of Norway). Prof. Eltoft is the Principal Investigator of CIRFA (Centre for Integrated Remote Sensing and Forecasting for Arctic Operations). Topics: Potential of Radar Remote Sensing in sea-ice research; new radar sensors; modes and algorithms for retrieval of geophysical properties. Use of unmanned aircraft for validating satellite data; integrated observing systems.

(Concurrent, 1:45-3 pm

#1-Theme 3: Contributions of the Private Sector and Industry to sustained Arctic observations

Room 412

THEME 3 DESCRIPTION: Decreasing sea ice extent coupled with an increasing interest in natural resource development are driving increased private sector activity in the Arctic, including oil and gas, shipping, fishing, tourism, and mining - along with associated port and coastal infrastructure development. There is a need for better Arctic information to support safe, responsible and effective industry operations. This information could be provided by an Arctic observing system involving the research community, governments, and industry. In particular, there is a need and opportunity for industry data collection and sharing, e.g. in relation to the World Ocean Council program on “Smart Ocean-Smart Industries”. This AOS 2016 theme will address the following questions: What information does industry need?  What data does, and can, industry collect and share? What assets and resources can industry offer to help sustain Arctic observations by industry and others?  What is the value proposition for industry? How can cooperation between industry and the research community be best coordinated?  What are the impediments to cooperation?

Co-leads: Paul Holthus (World Ocean Council, USA); David Arthurs (Polar View Earth Observation Limited, Canadian Office) 

Description: Panel discussion. Industry needs for Arctic Observations and Data. 

Framing question: What information does industry need?

Chair: David Arthurs, Managing Director, Polar View Earth Observation Ltd. 

Panelists: Liz Cravalho (NANA Regional Corporation Inc.); Stephanie Madsen (APA, At-sea Processors Association); Katherine Wilson (Canadian Ice Service, Ottawa) ; Jennifer Hutchings (Ice Watch, Oregon State University); Kevin Hilmer-Pegram (UAF);  Drue Pearce (Crowell & Moring).

(Concurrent, 1:45-3 pm

#1-Theme 4: Actor and Stakeholder engagement and needs in sustained Arctic observations

Room 206

THEME 4 DESCRIPTION: Rapid Arctic change is impacting a range of stakeholders at regional and global scales. Arctic observing systems hence need to serve a dual function, providing critical information to actors and stakeholders (interested in or impacted by Arctic change, or interested in learning about change and taking action), and supporting scientific research. Such hybrid observing system approaches require the empowerment and involvement of actors and stakeholders at all stages of system design and operation, including capacity-building and taking action. The role of knowledge and observing needs is critical as an integral part and prerequisite of all of the stages. White papers that address capacity building or development of observing systems that can support community emergency response plans and adaptation are particularly encouraged. These may address different models of community engagement, and data and information transfer approaches meant to serve the knowledge needs for communities faced with threats from climate change, coastal erosion and other emergencies. Adaptation and long-range planning are critical components in community survival, especially when faced with short or long-term natural disasters or natural changes that are difficult to deal with. The long-term well-being and sustainability of Arctic communities and the resilience of the environment depend on dialogue and solutions-based approaches which pivot on strong partnerships, trust, respect and open communication.

Co-leads: Craig Fleener (Office of the Governor, Cabinet Office, Alaska); Martin Sommerkorn (WWF Global Arctic Program, Norway office)

Description: Speakers and discussion. Novel dimensions of observations (new and worthwhile types of observations and needs to communicate results that have consequences for science and knowledge users). Dr. Peter Pulsifer (primary speaker; National Snow and Ice Data Center) - Indigenous Knowledge: Key Considerations for Arctic Research and Data Management. Dr. Martin Sommerkorn (WWF Global Arctic Programme) - Observing the benefits people receive from nature—ecosystem services. 

Questions for Discussion: (1) Scientists have a great understanding of the work they and their colleagues are engaged in. How do we ensure that the public, policy makers, and politicians are better informed?  (2) Indigenous people have demonstrated resiliency on the land through many periods of abrupt and dramatic change. Are we doing enough to ensure that Science & Indigenous Knowledge are properly woven together into seamless research?

Session Goals: Identify effective methods of communicating observation.

(Concurrent, 1:45-3 pm 

#1-Theme 5: Arctic Observations in the Context of Global Observing Initiatives

Room 306

THEME 5 DESCRIPTION: The Arctic is an integral part of the global system. Thus, observations conducted in the Arctic have to be synchronized with existing and emerging global observing systems such as the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). During AOS 2016, this theme will include consideration of physical, natural, environmental, social, economic, and cultural relationships between Arctic and non-Arctic regions with special focus on the link of Arctic and global observations in the areas of sensor technologies, observing platforms, observation frequency and spatial resolution, and data repositories. In addition, as the Arctic is part of global feedbacks and linkages which in turn influence many facets of ecosystem health, Arctic economies and livelihoods, and community well-being, consideration and discussion of observing systems within and beyond the Arctic must include some tracking of ecosystem components, drivers and stressors related to these linkages.

Co-leads: Hiroyuki Enomoto (National Institute of Polar Research, Japan); Dominique Berod (GEO Secretariat, Switzerland) 

Chaired by Dr. Seong-Joong Kim.

Description: Speakers and discussion. Global coordination for Arctic observations: for Who? Speaker: Dr. Thomas Jung (Alfred Wegener Institute) - an example of a user-driven project: YOPP, Year of Polar Prediction.

Discussion: Identification of users and users’ needs, and the contribution of Arctic observations to global mechanisms. Wrap-up and recommendations.

(Concurrent, 1:45-3 pm 

#1-Theme 6: Interfacing Indigenous Knowledge, Community-based Monitoring and Scientific Methods for sustained Arctic observations 

Room 208

THEME 6 DESCRIPTION: Indigenous knowledge plays a key role in identifying the scope, interconnectedness and impacts of rapid Arctic environmental change. It is now broadly recognized that community-based observations and Indigenous Knowledge are important elements of scientific observing systems. Nevertheless, we are still lacking interfaces, methodologies and frameworks that allow for effective and culturally appropriate exchange and analysis of ideas, expertise and information between the environmental sciences and Indigenous Knowledge. AOS 2016 will review current best practices and explore different models of how to better utilize Indigenous Knowledge and community-based observations in Arctic observing systems. These efforts will inform specific next steps towards overarching efforts and demonstration projects that will be discussed and developed as part of the AOS 2016 process.

Co-leads: Raychelle Aluaq Daniel (Arctic Conservation Science Team, Pew Charitable Trusts); Lene Kielsen Holm (Greenland Climate Research Center, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources); Rodd Laing (Nunatsiavut Government) 

>> DOCUMENT: description and invitation

Facilitator: Carolina Behe

Description: Facilitated discussions. Breakout Session 1 will lay out the foundation for this theme. This session will link the importance for establishing a bridge between indigenous communities and decision-makers (both policy and research). We will define the terminology that we are using for both Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and Community-­based Monitoring (CBM). We will present and discuss the high-level recommendations from our synthesis of the white papers and review process that includes: IK has its own methodologies for monitoring; both science and IK are important for a holistic understanding of the environment from which informed decision-making should be based; and there is a need to move towards co-production of knowledge to increase our understanding of Arctic systems.

3 pm BREAK (~15 to 30 min) 
3:30-4:45 pm

2. BREAK-OUT SESSIONS & PRESENTATIONS - Thematic Working Groups - CONCURRENT

Building: Gruening   |   Rooms: See below for each Theme

Concurrent break-out sessions are open to all AOS participants and focus on AOS input from the white papers and statements addressing each of the six AOS 2016 themes (descriptions on AOS 2016 website).  

(Concurrent, 3:30-4:45 pm

#2-Theme 1: International and National Strategies for sustained support of long-term Arctic Observing

Room 409

Description: Speakers and discussion. International Coordination. Speaker: Dr. Wolfgang Schöner (Dept. of Geography and Regional Science, University of Graz). Contributor: Dr. Nicole Biebow (EU-PolarNet, Alfred Wegener Institute). Contributor: Dr. Gabriela Ibarguchi (University of Calgary).

(Concurrent, 3:30-4:45 pm

#2-Theme 2: Technology and Innovation for sustained Arctic observations

Room 408

Description: Speakers and discussion. Strategies for sustained support of long-term Arctic observing and Technology. Speaker: Dr. Mark Ivey (Sandia National Laboratories).Dr. Ivey is the manager for the DOE’s ARM climate research facilities in Alaska and is also a distinguished member of the technical staff at Sandia where he has worked since the early 1980's.  Speaker: Dr. Michel Rixen (World Climate Research Programme; Polar Challenge). Dr. Rixen, a Senior Scientific Officer and part of the WCRP Joint Planning Staff (World Meteorological Organization), will provide an overview of the Polar Challenge, an innovative competition to complete a 2000 km continuous mission with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) under the sea ice in the Arctic or Antarctic.

(Concurrent, 3:30-4:45 pm 

#2-Theme 3: Contributions of the Private Sector and Industry to sustained Arctic observations

Room 412

Description: Panel discussion. Industry experience in data collection and sharing.

Framing questions: (1) What data does, and can, industry collect and share? (2) What assets and resources can industry offer to help sustain Arctic Observations? (3) What is the value proposition for Industry?

Chair: Paul Holthus, CEO, World Ocean Council

Panelists: Michael Macrander (Shell); Rada Khadjinova (Fugro); Eric Febbo (ExxonMobil); Rajiv Taneja (exactEarth, Ltd.); Torbjørn Eltoft (CIRFA, Centre for Integrated Remote Sensing and Forecasting for Arctic Operations, Norway).

(Concurrent, 3:30-4:45 pm

#2-Theme 4: Actor and Stakeholder engagement and needs in sustained Arctic observations

Room 206

Description: Speakers and discussion. Approaches and tools for actor and stakeholder engagement and for building capacity. Embedding observations to strengthen stakeholder capacity to take action.

James Simon (primary speaker, Northern Region Supervisor - Subsistence Division - Alaska Department of Fish & Game) - Indigenous Arctic Observing.  Craig Fleener (Arctic Policy, Office of the Governor, State of Alaska) - Disaster Preparedness. 

Questions for discussion: (1) Are there existing models of success for involving stakeholders? (2) Capacity-building as a strategy has been difficult to master and maintain.  How do we overcome this adversity?

Session Goals: To contemplate improved disaster preparedness from the observer or stakeholder perspective, and to identify methods for improved stakeholder engagement.

(Concurrent, 3:30-4:45 pm

#2-Theme 5: Arctic Observations in the Context of Global Observing Initiatives

Room 306

Chaired by Hiroyuki Enomoto.

Description: Speakers and discussion. Global coordination for Arctic observations: not just snow and ice. Speaker 1: Dr. Joanna Bullard (Dept. of Geography, Loughborough Univ.) - Arctic Dust Observation. Speaker 2: Renee Tatusko (NOAA National Weather Service): The International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA).

Discussion: Emerging topics will be highlighted that need focus, strengthening, and parameters that require global coordination.

(Concurrent, 3-4:45 pm

#2-Theme 6: Interfacing Indigenous Knowledge, Community-based Monitoring and Scientific Methods for sustained Arctic observations

Room 208

Facilitator: Julie Raymond-Yakoubian

Description: Facilitated discussions. Breakout Session 2 will examine in more detail the components of Community-based Monitoring (CBM) projects that are successful from an Indigenous Knowledge lens. This will be a facilitated session that examines the components that make up best practices. Positive examples of CBM will be highlighted.

4:45-5:15 pm

Brief Wrap-up

Davis Concert Hall

Moderator: Maribeth Murray

Following the breakout sessions under each AOS theme, this brief wrap-up session will be used to discuss the preliminary input from AOS white papers, Thematic Working Groups, and AOS participants. Focused discussion will continue during AOS Day 2 and Day 3.

5:30-8 pm

AOS POSTER SESSION - Building: Wood Center   |   Room: Second Floor Mezzanine 

(Please note: entrance to Poster Session and social event will require photo id such as a passport, driver's license, etc.)



ARCTIC OBSERVING SUMMIT - DAY 2

THURSDAY, MARCH 17 

7:15 - 8: 30 am  *AOS Executive Organizing Committee Meeting and Co-leads Breakfast Meeting Building: Gruening   |   Room: 303 (CLOSED)  
8:45-10:45 am 

PLENARY - SESSION C - AOS 2016 THEMES

Davis Concert Hall

Moderator: Eva Kruemmel

Synopsis and highlights from white papers from each of the six AOS 2016 themes (15 min + 5 min discussion each)

Presentations will include overviews by AOS Thematic Working Group Co-leads under each theme. Input from these presentations will contribute to the AOS Thematic Working Group breakout sessions that follow. (Open to all AOS participants)

  • Theme 1- International and National Strategies for sustained support of long-term Arctic Observing - Co-leads: Andrea Tilche (European Commission); Jeremy Mathis (NOAA)

  • Theme 2- Technology and Innovation - Co-leads: Cliff Sweatte (ICAO, International Civil Aviation Organization, USA); Rune Storvold (NORUT, Norway)

  • Theme 3- Contributions of the Private Sector and Industry - Co-leads: Paul Holthus (World Ocean Council, USA); David Arthurs (Polar View Earth Observation Limited, Canadian Office)

  • Theme 4- Actor and Stakeholder Engagement and Needs - Co-leads: Craig Fleener (Office of the Governor, Cabinet Office, Alaska); Martin Sommerkorn (WWF Global Arctic Program, Norway office)

  • Theme 5-Arctic Observations in the context of Global Observing Initiatives - Co-leads: Hiroyuki Enomoto (National Institute of Polar Research, Japan); Dominique Berod (GEO Secretariat, Switzerland)

  • Theme 6- Interfacing Indigenous Knowledge, Community-based Monitoring and Scientific Methods - Co-leads: Raychelle Aluaq Daniel (Arctic Conservation Science Team, Pew Charitable Trusts); Lene Kielsen Holm (Greenland Climate Research Center, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources); Rodd Laing (Nunatsiavut Government) 

10:45-11:00 am BREAK 
11 am -12:15 pm 

3. BREAK-OUT SESSIONS & PRESENTATIONS - Thematic Working Groups - CONCURRENT

Building: Gruening   |   Rooms: See below for each Theme

Concurrent break-out sessions are open to all AOS participants and focus on AOS input from the white papers and statements addressing each of the six AOS 2016 themes (descriptions on AOS 2016 website). 

(Concurrent, 11 am - 12:15 pm

#3-Theme 1: International and National Strategies for sustained support of long-term Arctic Observing

Room 409

Co-leads: Andrea Tilche (European Commission); Jeremy Mathis (NOAA) 

Description: Speakers and discussion. Support Strategies. Speaker: Christine Daae Olseng (15 min - SAON, Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks). Contributor: Dr. Sue Moore (NOAA/NMFS/OST). Contributor: Dr. Tatiana Vlasova (Institute of Geography Russian Academy of Sciences). Contributor: Dr. Scott Harper (Office of Naval Research, USA).

 (Concurrent, 11 am - 12:15 pm

#3-Theme 2: Technology and Innovation for sustained Arctic observations

Room 408

Co-leads: Cliff Sweatte (ICAO, International Civil Aviation Organization, USA); Rune Storvold (NORUT, Norway) 

Description: Speakers and discussion. Intelligent integrated observing systems. Speaker: Dr. Cathy Cahill (ACUASI and Arctic Science Operations) - Alaska Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration (ACUASI).

 (Concurrent, 11 am - 12:15 pm

#3-Theme 3: Contributions of the Private Sector and Industry to sustained Arctic observations

Room 412

Co-leads: Paul Holthus (World Ocean Council, USA); David Arthurs (Polar View Earth Observation Limited, Canadian Office)  

Description: Workshop. Fostering data collection and sharing by industry.

Framing questions: (1) How can cooperation between industry and the research community be best coordinated? (2) What are the impediments to cooperation?

Co-chairs: Paul Holthus and David Arthurs. Participants: Structured workshop discussion with all attendees.

 (Concurrent, 11 am - 12:15 pm

#3-Theme 4: Actor and Stakeholder engagement and needs in sustained Arctic observations

Room 206

Co-leads: Craig Fleener (Office of the Governor, Cabinet Office, Alaska); Martin Sommerkorn (WWF Global Arctic Program, Norway office) 

Description: Speakers and discussion. Observations for identifying sustainable pathways in the context of responding to social and ecological change.

Tom Armstrong (primary speaker; President, Madison River Group LLC.; Chair of Arctic Council assessment, “Adaptation Actions for a Changing Arctic”) - Adaptation Actions for a Changing Arctic (AACA): The Transition from Science Assessments to a Science-Decision Making Process Founded Upon Sustained Observations and Sound Science.
Paula Williams (University of Alaska Anchorage; co-authored with Lilian Alessa) - Incorporating Community Based Observing Networks for Better Preparedness and Enhanced Responses to Marine Arctic Critical Events. Marcus Carson (Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden) - Developing Indicators of Social-Ecological Resilience.

Questions for discussion: (1) Tremendous change is being experienced in the Arctic, especially amongst those who live on the land.  What are the pathways to improved adaptation? (2) Because of economic difficulties, lack of services, and other problems, many rural residents have and are moving into urban Alaska.  Is there a sustainable pathway to rural community strengthening? Or, is it an impossible task?  

Session Goals: Identify pathways to success through ecological and environmental change, and to contemplate regulatory and policy level solutions that empower adaptation and resilience.

(Concurrent, 11 am - 12:15 pm 

#3-Theme 5: Arctic Observations in the Context of Global Observing Initiatives

Room 306

Co-leads: Hiroyuki Enomoto (National Institute of Polar Research, Japan); Dominique Berod (GEO Secretariat, Switzerland) 

Chaired by Dominique Bérod. 

Description: Speakers and discussion. Global coordination for Arctic observations: contributors. Speakers: Dr. Matthew Druckenmiller (National Snow and Ice Data Center, Univ. of Colorado Boulder) - Global coordination mechanisms for the Arctic; and Dr. Wolfgang Schöner (Dept. of Geography and Regional Science, Univ. of Graz) - the Global Cryosphere Watch (GCW). 

Discussion: Building an efficient coordination system: which organizations, which mechanisms?
Wrap-up and recommendations. 

(Concurrent, 11 am - 12:15 pm 

#3-Theme 6: Interfacing Indigenous Knowledge, Community-based Monitoring and Scientific Methods for sustained Arctic observations

Room 208

Co-leads: Raychelle Aluaq Daniel (Arctic Conservation Science Team, Pew Charitable Trusts); Lene Kielsen Holm (Greenland Climate Research Center, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources); Rodd Laing (Nunatsiavut Government)  

Facilitator: (*TBA)

Description: Facilitated discussions. Breakout Session 3 will cover some of the recommendations that the Thematic Working Group has identified as guidelines for sustaining long-term observing systems that truly come from an Indigenous Knowledge lens. Some of the recommendations include education, capacity building and co-production of knowledge.

12:15-1:45 pm  LUNCH 
1:45-3 pm

PLENARY - SESSION D - AOS 2016 Cross-cutting topics

Davis Concert Hall

Moderator: Maribeth Murray

Plenary sessions will highlight the key findings from the white paper process including identified priorities, challenges, and progress to date under each theme. Cross-theme discussions will lead into breakout sessions. (25 min. each incl. questions)

  • Data management and access: Peter Pulsifer, National Snow and Ice Data Center 

  • Private-public partnerships: Paul Holthus (World Ocean Council) and Michael Macrander (Shell)

 3 pm BREAK (~15 to 30 min) 
 3:30-5 pm

4. BREAK-OUT SESSIONS - Cross-theme discussions & Synergies - Thematic Working Groups

Building: Gruening   |   Room: See below for combined themes

Concurrent break-out sessions are open to all AOS participants. These sessions focus on cross-theme discussions and issues that are broader in scope and link components of various themes. 

(Concurrent, 3:30 - 5 pm)

#4A - Cross-theme discussions - COMMUNITY-BASED MONITORING

Room 208 (max. capacity 80; if session is too large: Schaible)

Facilitator: Shari Gearheard

Description: Facilitated discussion with THEME 6 as lead, and linkages to THEME 1 and THEME 4. Based on the white papers submitted to this session, the reviews, and the draft synthesis, a consistent message was that in order for successful, long-term observation an imperative that scales from the Indigenous Knowledge holder in the community to the decision-maker is needed. Linkages with Theme 1: looking towards sustainable observations systems that will also meet the needs of Indigenous Knowledge holders in Arctic communities. 

(Concurrent, 3:30 - 5 pm)

#4B - Cross-theme discussions - DATA ACCESSIBILITY AND MANAGEMENT

Room 206 (if session is too large: Schaible)

Facilitator: Peter Pulsifer (*TBA)

Description: Facilitated discussion; linkages among ALL THEMES. Topics: data ownership; storage and archiving; interoperability; cyber-infrastructure and platforms; accessibility; user needs.

(Concurrent, 3:30 - 5 pm)

#4C - Cross-theme discussions - INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIPS

Room 409 

Description: Facilitated discussion with THEME 5 as lead, and linkages to THEME 4, THEME 1 AND THEME 2. 

Chaired by Hiroyuki Enomoto.

Global coordination for Arctic observations: The way forward. Speaker 1: Dr. Yuji Kodama (National Institute of Polar Science) - Long-term plan for Arctic environmental research. Speaker 2: Dr. Seong-Joong Kim (Korea Polar Research Institute) - Arctic observations for monitoring and understanding Arctic climate change.

Discussion: How to build sustainable, efficient and user-driven observations networks for cross-cutting issues. Contributors: Nicole Biebow (EU-PolarNet); Donald Forbes (Future Earth Coasts). Wrap-up and recommendations for next AOS.

(Concurrent, 3:30 - 5 pm)

#4D- Cross-theme discussions - TECHNOLOGY

Room 408 

Description: Facilitated discussion with THEME 2 as lead, and linkages to THEME 3 , THEME 5 AND THEME 4. 

Towards a pan-Arctic observing network. Speaker: Dr. Rune Storvold (Head of Unit, Unmanned Aircraft Group, Norhern Research Institute, Norway) - Ny-Ålesund Unmanned Aircraft Facility.

(Concurrent, 3:30 - 5 pm)

#4E - Cross-theme discussions - FLEXIBLE TOPIC (#4E)

Room 412 (max. capacity 30-48 people)

Description: Theme 4 - CONTINUED CROSS-THEME DISCUSSION - Actor and stakeholder empowerment and engagement

(Concurrent, 3:30 - 5 pm)

#4A - Cross-theme discussions - FLEXIBLE TOPIC (#4F)

Room 306 (max. capacity 30-70 people)

Description: Facilitated discussion; topic will be selected with input from AOS participants during Summit. 

 5-5:30 pm BREAK 
 5:30-8 pm

AOS POSTER SESSION 2 -  Building: Wood Center   |   Room: Second Floor Mezzanine

(Please note: entrance to Poster Session and social event will require photo id such as a passport, driver's license, etc.) 



ARCTIC OBSERVING SUMMIT - DAY 3

FRIDAY, MARCH 18 

7:15-8:30 am  *AOS Executive Organizing Committee Meeting and Co-leads Breakfast Meeting Building: Gruening   |   Room: 303 (CLOSED)   
8:45 - 10:45 am 

PLENARY - SESSION E - AOS 2016 Cross-cutting topics and reports from Thematic Working Groups

Davis Concert Hall

Moderator: Jan René Larsen

Plenary sessions will synthesize results from the AOS 2016, including findings from breakout sessions and cross-cutting issues relevant to implementation, collaboration, priorities, gaps, and sustained support for an international Arctic Observing System of Systems. 

Presentations

  • Stephen Volz (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) - Sustained observations: Integrating remote sensing platforms and data into sustained observations - NOAA Satellite Programs
  • David Carlson (World Climate Research Programme) - How can the WMO address challenges that come with rapid Arctic change across a range of sectors that require responses and partnerships?

Synthesis: AOS 2016

Brief reports and contribution to conference statement from each AOS Thematic Working Group (10 min each)

  • Theme 1 - Co-leads 
  • Theme 2 - Co-leads 
  • Theme 3 - Co-leads 
  • Theme 4 - Co-leads 
  • Theme 5 - Co-leads 
  • Theme 6 - Co-leads
10:45-11:00 am  BREAK
11:00 am-1 pm  

PLENARY - SESSION F and G - DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION - AOS 2016

Davis Concert Hall

Moderator: Peter Schlosser

Synthesis: AOS 2016

SESSION F: Panel Discussion: AOS recommendations and conference statement

  • Arctic Council and IASC, Sustaining Arctic Observation Networks (SAON): Christine Daae Olseng, Chair

  • Arctic Council, Permanent Participants: Jannie Staffansson, Saami Council, Norway 

  • Arctic Council,  Emergency Prevention, Preparedness and Response Working Group (EPPR): Amy Merten, Chair 

   • Arctic Council, Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF): Gilbert Castellanos 

  • Arctic Council, Sustainable Development Working Group (SDWG): Roberta Burns, Chair, U.S. Department of State 

  • Arctic Council, Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) - Thomas Armstrong, Chair, Arctic Council AACA (Adpatation Actions for a Changing Arctic)


SESSION G - AOS 2016 outcomes and the future:

  • AOS 2016 Outcomes and the future: AOS Executive Organizing Committee 

  • Highlight key findings and progress: AOS Executive Organizing Committee 

  • Final discussion and questions from audience 

  • Call for action and conference statement: AOS EOC, working groups, and members from international organizations 

  • Priorities, Gaps and Recommendations  

  • Plans for AOS 2018 and AOS 2016 Conclusion  

1 - 2:30 pm  LUNCH
2:30 - 3:30 pm  *AOS Executive Organizing Committee Meeting -  Building: Gruening   |   Room 303 (CLOSED)